A Fool-Proof Formula for Easily Curing Motion Sickness

A Fool-Proof Formula for Easily Curing Motion Sickness

Motion sickness can strike anytime, whether you travel by plane, train, or automobile. You may even feel queasy playing a videogame or riding a rollercoaster.

The underlying cause is a kind of sensory mismatch. Your brain works all day to keep your body in balance. When your eyes see motion while your body is staying still, confusion sometimes sets in. Typical symptoms include headaches and vomiting.


Once motion sickness starts, it’s hard to turn back. On your next outing, try these easy solutions to prevent motion sickness and get fast relief.

Diet Changes That Help Alleviate Motion Sickness

1. Opt for protein. High protein foods are the most effective. Bring along a nutrition bar or fill a thermos with a protein powder shake.

2. Hold the grease. Give your stomach a break from fatty foods, including French fries and doughnuts.

3. Time your snacks. On a short trip, you’re better off eating nothing at all. For longer hauls, plan on dining every few hours. Keep each meal small and high in protein and complex carbohydrates. Good choices include a green salad with chick peas or cottage cheese with fruit.

4. Avoid alcohol. Liquor will throw off your balance even more. Stick to water, juice, or soft drinks.

5. Enjoy ginger. Ginger is a traditional remedy for nausea. Sip ginger tea or swallow capsules you can find in health food stores or supermarkets.

6. Munch on crackers. Saliva builds up when your stomach starts to churn. Dry your mouth out with crackers, olives, or lemonade.

7. Drink a soda. Carbonated beverages may also soothe upset stomachs. See if a can of cola works for you.

Other Changes That Can Reduce Motion Sickness

1. Distract yourself. Anxiety increases your chances of falling ill. Listen to music or daydream about your beach destination.

2. Quit smoking. Tobacco is another irritant that also interferes with your breathing. Talk with your doctor about the latest cessation methods.

3. Hold still. It’s especially important to keep your head steady. Buy a comfortable pillow for your trip or use the headrest.

4. Breathe in fresh air. Give your stomach a chance to calm down. Stay up on deck on ships or open the window when riding in a car. On a plane, you’ll just have to breathe deeply.

5. Take a nap. Fatigue weakens all your defenses. Get a good night’s sleep before departing. If you can sleep while you’re in transit, take advantage of the opportunity.

6. Position yourself for success. Pick a spot where you can minimize the motion and conflicting signals. Ask for a seat over the wings on a plane or the middle cabin on a ship. Volunteer to do the driving or sit in the front passenger seat of the car.

7. Put down your book. Catch up on your reading later. The eye movements add to the stress.

8. Switch off the videos. The same is true for watching videos. Listen to an audio recording or talk with your companions.

9. Consider acupressure. Bracelets that press down on a strategic point on your wrist may be a helpful aid. You can try it out by holding your thumb between the tendons slightly above your wrist.

10. Use medications. You’ve probably heard of Dramamine and other over-the-counter products. It’s usually best to take them before the symptoms start. If you need stronger stuff, talk with your doctor about prescription drugs.

Plan your next vacation or business trip without worrying about turning green and running to the nearest bathroom. Getting motion sickness under control puts you back in charge and makes your travels more comfortable.

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